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The Buzz

Don't Miss the Final Supermoon of 2019




(Photo via Shutterstock)

Not only does Wednesday mark the official start of spring, but it's also a night where you'll want to turn your eyes to the sky as long as Mother Nature cooperates with clear weather.

That's because it will be the third consecutive — and final — supermoon of the year. Officially, it's called the worm moon, and for good reason. That's because in March, as the temperatures begin to rise, the forest and prairies return to life. Worms, and a plethora of other squirmy things, begin doing their thing. 

This celestial event comes after we've already been treated to a total lunar eclipse and supermoon in January and then a full snow moon in February. If you miss this one, you'll have to wait until February 9, 2020 for the next supermoon.

RELATED: FLOWER MOON HIKE AT THORN CREEK WOODS

The best viewing for supermoons happens just after the moon rises because it will appear the most dramatic against the horizon. On Wednesday in the Chicago area, the moon will rise at 6:45 p.m.

One thing that makes this supermoon even more unique is that it occurs on the same day as the vernal equinox, which is the first time that has happened since 1981.

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